Skewed distribution


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Skewed distribution

Probability distribution in which an unequal number of observations lie below (negative skew) or above (positive skew) the mean.

Skewed Distribution

A probability distribution where more data points lie on one side of the mean than the other. This means that the distribution will not form a bell curve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the most critical factor to consider when assessing client satisfaction is the highly skewed distributions that all instruments produce.
The renter-occupied housing units showed a positively skewed distribution (skewness ~ 1.
For a sample size of 120, the 90% confidence interval corresponds to approximately [+ or -] 10% around the percentile in case of a gaussian distribution, and approximately [+ or -] 25% for the skewed distribution (the percentage of the width of the reference interval).
Since we assume a skewed distribution, the matching probability is not equal, but decreases in the tail of the distribution, as shown in Figure 3.
71 per cent in job offers, manufacturing sector had a highly skewed distribution of new job openings in the metros.
When corn paring income levels, median income is generally the most reliable measurement, as income tends to have a skewed distribution.
Scaling-up antiretroviral treatment to socially meaningful levels in low-income countries with a high AIDS burden is constrained by (1) the growing caseload of people to be maintained on long-term treatment, (2) problems of shortage and skewed distribution in the health workforce, and (3) the heavy workload involved in current treatment delivery models.
This depicts that the focus of financial institutions has been on medium entities," he said and added the primary reason for this skewed distribution was the unorganized way of doing business by small entities.
However, despite the fact that both the public and private sectors are feeling the impact of shortages, the skewed distribution of human resources between the public and private sectors is enormous.
Subject to multiple selection biases in the identification and reporting of WHO-confirmed human cases of avian influenza A (H5N1) (2), our analysis yields 3 noteworthy observations: 1) case counts and case rates suggest similar levels of disease activity in the age categories 0-9, 10-19, and 20-29 years; 2) few cases have occurred above the age band of 30-35 years; and 3) the skewed distribution of cases toward children and young adults transcends sex, reporting period, patient outcome, geographic location, and, by implication, local cultural and demographic determinants.
From these, students were directed to identify histograms displaying means and standard deviations similar to a "reference" histogram and to identify a skewed distribution.
A positively skewed distribution will have proportionately more observations in the lower class intervals, and more of the map will have the associated graphic value (unless the observation units vary significantly in size).