Sit-Down Strike

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Sit-Down Strike

A strike in which union members or, rarely, other employees, come to work but sit at their workstations and do not perform their duties. The purpose behind a sit-down strike is to make it difficult or impossible for the employer to hire replacement workers to replace the strikers. This is supposed to make the strike more effective. See also: Lock-out.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were 60 sit-down strikes in Chicago in the month of March alone.
Though on February 27, 1939, the Court ruled that sit-downs violated property owners' rights, the ruling had little to do with the decline of sit-down strikes.
The reader, for example, is meant to credit the one newspaper account of the sit-down strike that the strikers deem accurate and which calls the issue of unemployment "a national responsibility demanding action by national authority and on a nation-wide scale.
This is perhaps unsurprising, given that Baird lived through a postwar political climate that was less than friendly to the Communist Party of Canada (CPC), a key player in the Vancouver Sit-Down Strike.
For instance, he emphasizes how precarious the union remained, and how much work was still left to be done, after the initial breakthroughs of the 1937 sit-down strikes.
For instance, the contribution of women to the sit-down strikes, which has been well explored elsewhere, is given only a few paragraphs.
Automobile and other industrial workers had won union recognition through sit-down strikes.
In Philadelphia, 5,000 workers engaged in sit-down strikes lasting about 4 hours before settling with eight hospitals and several clinics.
Ray has been described in the press as labor's most innovative strategist and "one of the most successful union organizers since the CIO sit-down strikes of the 1930s.