Single

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Single

In American taxation, the filing status for a legally unmarried person who does not qualify for any other filing status. In other words, single is the default filing status. This may affects one's tax liability; for example, single filers have lower income limits for most exemptions.

Single

The filing status used by an unmarried taxpayer who does not qualify for any other filing status.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this contribution was limited and eventually phased out for single taxpayers whose modified Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) ranged between $95,000 and $110,000, and married joint filers with combined income between $150,000 and $160,000.
In 2002 and 2003, single taxpayers with adjusted gross income up to $65,000 ($130,000 on joint returns) would receive a maximum deduction of $3,000 per year.
While this has no effect on the single taxpayer, a married couple may easily be underwithheld if their combined income is more than $250,000 but neither makes more than $200,000 individually.
The new law increases the phaseout range for married taxpayers filing a joint return so that it is twice the range for single taxpayers.
Thus, married filing jointly taxpayers lose a portion of the combined basic standard deduction if they had filed as single taxpayers.
In 2000, single taxpayers with up to $26,250 in taxable income were in the 15% bracket, which jumps to $43,850 for joint filers.
Those eligible to contribute the full $2,000 a year are single taxpayers with annual modified adjusted gross income (AGI) up to $95,000 and couples falling jointly with up to $150,000 of modified AGI.
Single taxpayers can take a $60 credit if they have adjusted gross incomes of $25,000 or less.
For those with higher incomes than these thresholds, the tax credit is reduced and is phased out completely for single taxpayers with a MAGI of $95,000 or more, and for married taxpayers with a MAGI of $170,000 or higher.
Therefore, the filing threshold in 2014, for taxpayers under 65 and not blind, is $10,150 for single taxpayers and $20,300 for married couples filing jointly
TIPRA Section 301 includes some relief from the AMT for 2006, via a temporary increase in the AMT exemptions, which will be $62,550 for those married filing jointly and $42,500 for single taxpayers (compared to $58,000 and $40,250, respectively, as provided in the Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004).
Married taxpayers with less than $44,000 in income or single taxpayers with less than $22,000 would pay no tax on Social Security benefits, indexed for inflation.