Single

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Single

In American taxation, the filing status for a legally unmarried person who does not qualify for any other filing status. In other words, single is the default filing status. This may affects one's tax liability; for example, single filers have lower income limits for most exemptions.

Single

The filing status used by an unmarried taxpayer who does not qualify for any other filing status.
References in periodicals archive ?
The taxpayer argued that the single taxpayer rule mandates that all intra-group transactions, whether from transactions with domestic or foreign affiliates, should be disregarded in calculating the research credit.
an increase in the standard deduction for married couples relative to single persons, a reduction in marginal tax rates) lowered marginal and average tax rate differences between married and single taxpayers.
Figure 1 illustrates the relationship between the effective capital gains tax rate and AGI levels for a single taxpayer with $10,000 of qualifying deductions subject to the phase-out penalty and who claims from one to six personal exemptions.
Beginning for the tax year of 2005, the taxable income for married taxpayers filing joint tax returns that is subject to the fifteen percent tax rate will be similarly increased to eventually equal 200 percent of the taxable income for single taxpayer that is subject to the fifteen percent tax rate.
Some of the income levels for a given tax bracket of MFJ taxpayers on the tax rate schedules are less than twice the income levels for single taxpayers.
These withholding changes, now permanent - or as permanent as any tax law can be - are designed to benefit low- and middle-income wage earners, defined as single taxpayers earning less than $53,200 or married taxpayers jointly earning less than $90,200.
For example, a single taxpayer would have to have an income of about $190,400 before the penalty for a full year would overtake the lower end of the estimated average bronze premium range (again, based on an estimated 2016 filing threshold: (2.
While this has no effect on the single taxpayer, a married couple may easily be underwithheld if their combined income is more than $250,000 but neither makes more than $200,000 individually.
To illustrate, assume a single taxpayer has $110,000 of adjusted gross income.
For example, the standard deduction for a single taxpayer in 2013 is $6,100; the new law assures that the standard deduction for married couples filing jointly will be twice as high: $12,200.
To illustrate, consider a single taxpayer who has wages of $200,000 in 2013.
For 2006 returns, the standard deduction for a single taxpayer is $5,150 and $10,300 fur married taxpayers filing jointly.