Sin Tax

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Sin Tax

A tax on a good or service considered socially or ethically undesirable. For example, a government may levy a tax on the sale of alcohol. A sin tax finances programs to discourage the undesirable practice (in this example, it may fund anti-teen drinking programs). However, a sin tax may simply be a way for a government to generate revenue from something people are expected to do anyway.
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This isn't the first time lawmakers have turned to sin taxes during hard times to raise money.
The brief, released March 21, points to major problems associated with sin taxes.
Cain, meanwhile, was telling the Senate that a number of legislators cannot look at any new taxes later this year "if the Legislature refuses to raise sin taxes.
According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, the Clinton Administration aims to increase revenue from sin taxes by $15 billion a year.
And he joins over 60 medical organizations in the Philippines as well as other civil society groups which have gotten together to petition President Duterte to make sure that TRAIN includes sin taxes.
446 billion was already accumulated out of sin taxes surpassing the target of P48.
You didn't say anything when they pushed tobacco ads off the air, or when they drove up the price of cigarettes with sin taxes, or when they tried to classify nicotine as a drug.
However, sin taxes were the more popular option for financing reform.
As a result of the BIR's decisive action against Mighty, we now expect revenues from sin taxes to increase by P1 billion a month,' Dominguez added.
The growth in collections on sin taxes disproves the allegations that the government is losing revenues through illicit trade," Jacinto-Henares said, adding the Oxford report is incomplete and lacks proper attribution as to source.
The golden goose of sin taxes is just about cooked," Ronald Alt, a senior research associate with the Federation of Tax Administrators reported in the New York Times.
It all seems straightforward, but all kinds of arguments have been used against sin taxes, and now the sugar tax.