Silver

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Related to Silver halide: Silver Halide paper

Silver

A precious metal with the highest electrical conduction properties of any metal. It is used mainly in jewelry, photography, and for scientific and industrial purposes. It has been used as the basis for currencies in the past. Silver is traded as a commodity on various security exchanges. Like many precious metals, silver is volatile but generally maintains relatively high prices.
References in periodicals archive ?
Van Zandt will share recent innovations in the area of silver halide printing, as well as present the case for why this particular media, long known for its quality and durability, should be a lab's first choice for photographic printing.
Now, silver halide comprises nearly 25 percent of the overall volume in revenue.
The Company is gaining increased recognition in global markets as an innovative and responsive single source supplier of silver halide products and services, on par with its major competitors.
s Imaging segment, operating globally as CPAC Imaging Group, provides imaging chemicals, environmental equipment, and refining services to the traditional silver halide photographic market.
Chief among the investors is Eastman Kodak Company, the world's leader in both traditional silver halide and digital imaging.
The QSS-37 Series are high performance, silver halide digital printers designed with advanced features for maximum productivity and revenue.
Voxel's new "hybrid" system uses both traditional silver halide film and digital technology to produce a holographic, three-dimensional image from computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data.
Kodak's digital imaging business is unprofitable at present and electronic technologies continue to encroach on the company's other silver halide businesses.
Itronics noted in its earnings release that "the use of silver halide photochemistry to make photographic prints is continuing to grow as is the use of returnable 35 mm cameras.
Verde Digital Film, invented at the Xerox Research Centre of Canada, creates images equal to or better than the best silver halide film, and removes the environmental hazards and costs associated with conventional chemical film processing.
He started his industrial career with Ilford Ltd, Ciba-Geigy in 1985 working on silver halide films and papers and has a number of scientific papers and patents to his name.
Verde Digital Film creates images equal to or better than the best silver halide film, and removes the environmental hazards and costs associated with conventional chemical film processing.