Announcement Effect

(redirected from Signal Effects)

Announcement Effect

A change in security prices or volatility as a result of some announcement. For example, if the Federal Reserve raises interest rates, stock prices are liable to fall. Likewise, if a company announces an acquisition, its stock may rise. The announcement effect may cause drastic price changes; as a result, companies and governments often selectively leak or hint at announcements before they occur to minimize surprises. The announcement effect is also called the signal effect. See also: Price out the News.
References in classic literature ?
The old maid's marriage had a signal effect in defining the two parties in Alencon.
The treatment with anti-TNF agents neutralises the signal effects of TNF and thus alleviates the suffering of those affected.
See, however, Staddon & Cerutti, 2003, for an alternative interpretation of signal effects in chained schedules.
Several studies have suggested that signal effects on operant behavior are strongly determined by interreinforcer interval (Schaal, Odum, & Shahan, 2000; Schaal, Schuh, & Branch, 1992).
The present study, as well as those preceding it, suggests that interreinforcer interval could have an important role in modulating signal effects when the visual or auditory cues are separated from the response selected for reinforcement.
Local response rates also suggest that signal effects on behavior may be highly varied (especially in the response-acquisition study), producing notable response-enhancing effects in Subject G5 and response-inhibiting effects in Subject G9.
The Channel Simulator adds phase-continuous and dynamic Doppler, delay, fading and AWGN perturbations to input signals, precisely duplicating these signal effects from an actual flight.
The GSS6400 Record & Playback system enables u-blox to capture complex real-world signal effects and then repeatedly replay the RF in the laboratory.
With the traditional receiver characterization tests, u-blox is able to test for real-world signal effects and classic challenges of navigation systems.
The clock buffers also let designers minimize undesirable signal effects such as cross-talk and Electromagnetic Interference (EMI).
Unlike analog-only solutions, which simply mask detrimental signal effects such as crosstalk and reflections, the D-PHY family actually removes these effects, ensuring maximum signal integrity.