Accident and Health Insurance

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Accident and Health Insurance

An insurance policy that provides coverage when the policyholder (or his/her dependent) becomes ill, is injured, or dies from an accident. For example, a health insurance policy may pay for most or all of the costs of a surgery. Accident and health insurance may cover doctor's visits, medical procedures, prescription drugs, and so forth. The policyholder pays a premium each month in exchange for the coverage; this premium may or may not be subsidized by one's employer. Additionally, the policyholder often must pay coinsurance and/or a copay for certain procedures. In the United States, many people procure accident and health insurance through their employers because it is often expensive to buy on one's own. Likewise, many people have group insurance to provide medical coverage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sickness and accident insurance plans have provided replacement income for disabled workers throughout the second half of the 201h century.
In general, sickness and accident insurance plans are designed to replace a portion of an employee's wages during a fixed duration of disability.
Over the past 30 years, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has tabulated data on the incidence and characteristics of sickness and accident insurance plans.
Insurance, including health, life, and sickness and accident insurance, was the second largest cost category, accounting for an average $1.
Regardless of year, the reports show that nearly all full-time employees of the sources surveyed have short-term protection, through either paid sick leave, paid sickness and accident insurance, or a combination of both.
All these EBS reports focused separately on the terms of sick leave and of sickness and accident insurance plans.
Since many of these days, particularly those from sickness and accident insurance plans, were paid at less than the regular rate of pay, the average number of full-pay equivalent days available was 76.
The discussion covers the major employee disability and insurance benefits: health care and life insurance, and plans providing disability income, such as paid sick leave, sickness and accident insurance, and long-term disability insurance.
The incidence of paid sick leave, however, was reversed (97 and 70 percent) because blue-collar government employees were usually covered by sick leave, rather than sickness and accident insurance.
During periods when they are disabled from working, employees receive income through paid sick leave, sickness and accident insurance, and long-term disability insurance.
Short-term disability protection was provided to 94 percent of these employees in 1983 in the form of paid sick leave plans, or sickness and accident insurance benefits, or both.
Conversely, two-thirds of blue-collar employees had sickness and accident insurance plans, compared with only one-third of the white-collar workers.