Sherman Antitrust Act

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Sherman Antitrust Act

The first legislation passed in the United States limiting trusts and monopolies. The Act prohibits agreements and collusion restricting trade, without providing many specifics. The Act was largely unenforced against the organizations it was intended to curtail. Indeed, the Act was invoked early on to restrict organized labor more than any other group. As a result, Congress passed the Clayton Act in 1914 to clarify American antitrust law. The Sherman Act has been criticized by many, notably Ayn Rand and her followers, for unfairly and inefficiently restricting the Invisible Hand of the market.

Sherman Antitrust Act

An 1890 federal antitrust law intended to control or prohibit monopolies by forbidding certain practices that restrain competition. In the early 1900s, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Act applied only to unreasonable restraints of trade and thus could be used only against blatant cases of monopoly.

Sherman Antitrust Act

One of the antitrust laws designed to encourage competition and discourage monopolies.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Federal Trade Commission justified a decision and order on the sale of those properties per Section 7 of the Clayton Act, a century-old law augmenting the Sherman Act of 1890.
The Sherman Act of 1890 had created considerable uncertainty as to whether the United States would be able to maintain gold-silver parity as the law required (this provision effectively prevented the Treasury from redeeming notes in silver even though the Sherman Act stated that the Treasury could legally redeem notes in either silver or gold coins at the discretion of the Treasury secretary).
The story begins with the enactment of our nation's basic antitrust law, the Sherman Act of 1890.
The Award is named for the author of the Sherman Act of 1890, the nation's first and foremost antitrust law.
South-Eastern Underwriters Association, an antitrust case brought under the Sherman Act of 1890.
The Sherman Act of 1890 deals with any business combination that might have a substantial economic impact on interstate commerce.