GI Bill

(redirected from Servicemen's Readjustment Act)
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GI Bill

Now called the Montgomery GI Bill, it offers support for veterans seeking postsecondary education.

References in periodicals archive ?
Colmery is considered the principal architect of the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, which established the World War II-era GI Bill.
In the US, the 1944 Servicemen's Readjustment Act (better known as the GI Bill) was a success because it provided training for those most in need of it, enabling returning World War Two veterans to reenter the productive economy.
The original GI Bill, or the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, as it is formally known, transformed American life.
Roosevelt signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the ''GI Bill of Rights.
2) The term GI [Government Issue] Bill, which originally referred to the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (Public Law 78-347), is now used to describe a range of benefits, including financial assistance for a college education.
The Disabled Veterans Act sanctioned vocational support, while the Servicemen's Readjustment Act provided vocational training and education for servicemembers whose careers were shortened by serving in the military.
After the Second World War, the USA brought in something called The Servicemen's Readjustment Act - popularly known as the "GI Bill" which guaranteed returning service people education, training or support to set up their own business.
The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, more commonly know as the GI Bill of Rights, was said to be one of the most important pieces of legislation for servicemembers at that time.
It could be said that the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, or G.
Quite by accident, according to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Humes, the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the GI Bill of Rights, sparked a profound transformation of American society and resulted in mass homeownership, greater access to higher education for all Americans, and the growth of suburbia.
His immediate postwar activities are unclear, though in 1948 he entered The Ohio State University, Columbus, under the provisions of the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (the G.

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