GI Bill

(redirected from Servicemen's Readjustment Act)
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GI Bill

Now called the Montgomery GI Bill, it offers support for veterans seeking postsecondary education.

References in periodicals archive ?
Roosevelt signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, better known as the GI Bill of Rights or the GI Bill.
Roosevelt signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, commonly known as the GI Bill of Rights.
The website starts off by explaining: "The VA Loan began in 1944 through the original Servicemen's Readjustment Act, also known as the GI Bill of Rights.
The GI Bill, or the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, was enacted in 1944 to help World War II veterans with their education costs.
Patman reintroduced his bill in 1936, when it did pass, laying the groundwork for the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, or the G.
Sixty years ago, Congress passed and President Roosevelt signed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the G.
Colmery, who wrote the original Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944.
Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, commonly known as the GI Bill of Rights, was signed into law June 22, 1944, by President Franklin D.
I Bill, officially known as the Servicemen's Readjustment Act, on June 22, 1944.
Members of The American Legion drafted the original Servicemen's Readjustment Act, popularly known as the GI Bill, in 1944.
The bill is an update of the historic law, officially titled the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, which has provided innumerable benefits to honorably discharged military personnel for generations.
The Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 - the original GI Bill - was the brainchild of American Legion members, most notably Past National Commander Harry Colmery, who drafted it in longhand from a room inside the Mayflower Hotel in Washington," Rehbein said.

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