Sell off

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Sell off

Sale of securities under pressure. See: Dumping.

Sell Off

The rapid sale of a security by a large number of holders. This increases the supply of the security available for sale and therefore drives down the price. Sell-offs occur for a number of reasons. A stock may drop suddenly in price if its company issues a negative earnings report, or if there are reports of a new technology rendering the company's product obsolete, or if the company's costs rise. Sell-offs also happen for other, perhaps less rational reasons. For example, a natural disaster, which may or may not affect supplies, can cause a sell-off. See also: Panic Sale.
References in periodicals archive ?
The trend in selling off tangible assets is one seen across England, with councils budgeting to bring in PS3.
Selling off valuable assets is not a great thing for a city to do at any time.
But the force would only consider selling off old police houses when and if they became available, she added.
But rival postal group TNT Post UK has claimed that selling off the Royal Mail could create a "privatised monopoly" and push up the price of stamps.
The Royal Bank of Scotland (LSE: RBS) is close to selling off its Asian assets.
Fellow Labour councillor Fred Johnson said: "They will be selling off the patches of green on the roundabouts next.
Selling off unused public property only seemed like a good idea -- before the politicians realized it might come at their expense.
It's not like the state is selling off its own assets; it's setting off someone else's," he says.
They are selling off `ecological subdivisions' -- mostly on land that should be protected for the use of the community--and reducing existing parks and nature reserves on the grounds that they are `an obstacle to development'.
Selling off the freight division of ONR, but ensuring the Little Bear and Polar Bear Express service from Cochrane to Moosonee are maintained;
Ironically, at the same time that the Pearson subsidiary was selling off Cap Pubs properties it was purchasing Tod Sedwick's company, Pasha Publications, and its energy-related newsletters and conferences for a reported $17.
Bastos Marques is now dumping that strategy, selling off those far-flung assets to focus on CSN's core steel business to make it bigger, meaner and more efficient in an increasingly competitive world market.