Self-Similar

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Self-Similar

When small parts of an object are qualitatively the same, or similar to the whole object. In certain deterministic fractals, like the Sierpinski Triangle, small pieces look the same as the entire object. In random fractals, small increments of time will be statistically similar to larger increments of time. See: Fractal.

Self-Similar

In mathematics, describing a condition in which the parts of an object are substantially the same as its whole. See also: Fractals.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper presents a formal conceptualization of the self-similarity adapted to the context SFCs and an efficient computational test to determine whether a specific SFC is self-similar.
Figures 2 to 5 are listed below and the self-similarity is clear.
Random fractals, as opposed to geometric fractals, do not have true self-similarity in that we do not see the exact same pattern repeated over and over.
From Section 2 and Figure 2, we know that fractal coding method aims to reduce the redundancy existing among different local parts of the input image and the quality of decoded images is determined by the self-similarity of input images.
inopina had significantly steeper slopes at all times after fire than predicted by self-similarity models.
Dimension of a fractal geometry can be defined in many ways, such as self-similarity dimension, topological dimension, Euclidean dimension and Hausdorff dimension.
where distribution parameters are calculated as follows for traffic with entity intensity [lambda] and self-similarity H :
Therefore, LGF has the characteristic of "grade" in fuzzy theory, and it describes to what extent a processing unit has the property of self-similarity.
The self-similarity or invariance under changes of scale or size is isotropic.
Another characteristic of fractal shapes is the self-similarity property employed to maintain antenna characteristics [3,4].
Fractals basically denote the self-similarity in image.
This remarkable researcher also demonstrated that many natural forms have self-similarity properties between different scales (MANDELBROT, 1983).