Self-Inflicted Injury

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Self-Inflicted Injury

The deliberate injury of oneself. Self-inflicted injuries may be the result of depression or may be a form of insurance fraud. In any case, many insurers exclude self-inflicted injuries from coverage.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in a qualitative study by Alexander and Clare (2004), participants stated that they stopped using NSSI due to "an awareness of the impact that self-injury had on valued others" (p.
Suppose the hypothetical individual with self-injury is perfectly capable of performing an alternate behavior under the relevant motivational conditions, e.
Nurses and counselors can assist the cutter to develop substitute strategies to reduce the incidence of self-injury.
As many school counselors have had little, if any, training in managing issues associated with student self-injury, this article is an attempt to increase school counselors' ability to integrate the ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors into their work with the growing self-injurious population.
Kaitlyn functioned on a eighteen month level and engaged in high rates of severe self-injury (hand-to-head, hand-to-jaw, hand-to-face, hand-biting).
Not only did the boy's arm flapping subside markedly within a few weeks of clomipramine treatment, but his anxiety, self-injury and social withdrawal lessened.
com/research/3afdaf/suicide_selfinju) has announced the addition of John Wiley and Sons Ltd's new book "Suicide, Self-Injury, and Violence in the Schools: Assessment, Prevention, and Intervention Strategies" to their offering.
based 501(c)(3) To Write Love on Her Arms(TWLOHA) as a 2013 Fueling Good Project winner for its work presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and suicide.
Walsh of Holden, executive director of the Bridge of Central Massachusetts, has written the second edition of his book, "Treating Self-Injury, A Practical Guide," which was published recently by Guilford Press of New York City.
It reviews possible benefits and pitfalls of self-injury treatment in these environments and presents approaches to minimize social contagion.
An estimated 13 percent to 26 percent of high school students engage in non-suicidal self-injury, says Alec Miller, clinical professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral science at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.