Self-Inflicted Injury

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Self-Inflicted Injury

The deliberate injury of oneself. Self-inflicted injuries may be the result of depression or may be a form of insurance fraud. In any case, many insurers exclude self-inflicted injuries from coverage.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the hospital setting, surgical/urological interventions need to be directed at the potentially life-threatening sequelae of self-injury.
One of the functions of NSSI identified in the Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury (ISAS; Klonsky & Glenn, 2009) is 'Anti-Suicide'.
Keywords: Non-suicidal self-injury, Hearing loss, Intellectual disability, Self-injurious.
6 The results of longitudinal researches showed that almost 50% of the individuals with ASD involve in some form of self-injury in any specific time period of their life span.
For many individuals, self-injury becomes a strategy to regulate overwhelming feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness, depression, guilt, shame, or isolation (Gratz, 2003, 2007; Klonsky, 2007, 2009; Nock & Mendes, 2008; Walsh, 2006).
Nonsuicidal self-injury as a time-invariant predictor of adolescent suicide ideation and attempts in a diverse community sample.
Self-injury is often a behavior that teenagers keep secret, typically cutting or scratching themselves on a part of the body that is easily covered (thighs, abdomen, upper arms).
Such concentrated focus on NSSI might then increase the chance of unintentionally severe self-injury during NSSI.
Therefore, when controlling for lifetime trauma, key psychiatric symptoms (depression, psychosis, mood dysregulation, and posttraumatic stress symptoms), thoughts of self-harm, thoughts of suicide, and lifetime self-injury, we hypothesized that Hispanic clients in this sample would report more suicide attempts.
Keywords: nonsuicidal self-injury, assessment, training, counselor education
Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) or deliberate destruction of one's body in the absence of suicidal intent (3) is most common in the middle school ages, and exposure to peer NSSI may increase the risk of engaging these behaviors.
CRT reviews are mandated for cases involving issues such as: self-injury, serious aggression and cases where limited progress is being made or client safety is a concern.