Second-Class Mail

Second-Class Mail

In the United States, the mail rate given to newspapers and magazines. To qualify for a second-class mail rate, the periodical must be at least quarterly and must not have advertising as its primary goal. On time delivery of second-class mail is given lower priority than first-class mail, which includes all mail and correspondence weighing less than 13 ounces.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recommended posting dates this year are December 19 for second-class mail, December 21 for first-class and December 23 for special delivery.
As we are approaching the last posting day for second-class mail, which is today, and first-class, which is Saturday, our customers are very keen to get their packages away on time," said David Dunn, manager at the plant, on the Team Valley in Gateshead.
According to latest figures for April to June, the service in the city scored higher than the national target of 93 per cent and beat the expectations for second-class mail also.
For second-class mail or express passenger traveling a distance of 375 km, the addition to the fare will be Rs.
Under radical changes outlined by regulator Ofcom, the price of second-class mail could rise from the current 36p to between 45p and 55p.
e o s r Under radical changes outlined by regulators Ofcom, the price of second-class mail could rise from the current 36p to between 45p and 55p.
Last posting dates are December 17 for second-class mail, December 20 for first-class and December 22 for special deliveries.
As well as cutting the service from six days to five, industry regulator Postcomm also plans less strict targets for both first-and second-class mail.
9% of second-class mail was delivered within three days, against Royal Mail's target of 98.
The company also reported that first and second-class mail had been performing at or above target levels for more than a year with around 94% of first-class letters arriving the next working day after posting.
They included first and second-class mail and home shopping items such as PlayStation games and DVDs, which he could have claimed extra payment for had he delivered them.
The most articulate opposition to government help for small magazines came, surprisingly, from our friend Michael Kinsley, who had already come out against the second-class mail "subsidy," as he called it, in a 1975 article in The Washington Monthly.