seasonal variation

(redirected from Seasonal Variations)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Seasonal Variation

A situation in which a company has better sales in certain times of the year than in other times. For example, a swimwear company likely has better sales in the summer, and toy companies likely perform better in the period preceding Christmas. Sales forecasts and reports often adjust to account for seasonal variation, and the companies often change the amount of inventory they carry to ensure that they are able to meet demand at the lowest cost.

seasonal variation

A regularly recurring change in the value of a variable. For example, electric utilities generally experience significant seasonal sales variations in electricity. Likewise, toy manufacturers have sales increases before Christmas.

seasonal variation

see SALES FORECASTING.

seasonal variation

see TIME-SERIES ANALYSIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
The functional flours industry is restrained by strict food labeling legislations and seasonal variations in the supply of raw materials.
Surface water quality was examined to determine spatial and seasonal variations in the Lower Kinabatangan River catchment, Sabah, Malaysia between October 2004 and June 2005, during the weak La Nina event.
The seasonal variations in biochemical status of the B vitamins and plasma tHcy throughout the four seasons are shown in Table 2.
Most recent research on macroeconomic fluctuations ignores the seasonal variation in the economy by working with seasonally adjusted or annual data.
Construction: When seasonal variations are removed from the data, a healthy employment outlook is in store for the Construction sector.
Sromovsky, Lockwood, and Hammel all agree that seasonal variations may only be part of the explanation for Neptune's remarkably dynamic atmosphere.
Aflatoxins are also prevalent in this population, and there are seasonal variations in the level of food contamination and therefore exposure (Turner et al.
Seasonal variations should be distinguished from periodic large epidemics, as observed every 2 years for measles (2) or at less frequent and more irregular intervals for meningococcal meningitis (3) and rubella (4).
9% growth after adjustment for inflation and seasonal variations.
With its large lips and small mouth, the sucker usually lives in cool, clean and clear water, although it can tolerate seasonal variations.
The index is not adjusted for seasonal variations, so the monthly changes partly reflect slower buying activity in the late summer and autumn.
Seasonal variations in the activities of selected hepatic biotransformation and antioxidant enzymes in eelpout (Zoarces viviparus).