Coverage

(redirected from Script reader)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Coverage

Coverage

1. The specific insured events for which an insurance company will pay a benefit. For example, a life insurance policy provides coverage in the event of death. Likewise, a health insurance policy provides money in the event of illness. Generally speaking, an insurance policy outlines what it covers and the benefits it provides under different circumstances.

2. A measure of a company's ability to pay its fixed liabilities. It is calculated by determining by subtracting its fixed payments from its operating income. High coverage indicates that the company can easily make its payments and indeed is able to set funds aside to do so in the event its income declines. Low coverage means that the company can make its payments but that it has less flexibility in doing so. A negative number indicates that the company cannot pay its fixed liabilities. The payments included in this calculation are lease payments, dividends on preferred stock, and debt service. It is also called fixed-charge coverage.
References in periodicals archive ?
He then worked as a film script reader, a stand-up comedian, a cartoonist and an NHS lackey before he finally turned to writing.
As a script reader for a film company, she hangs out with the beautiful people.
Wednesdays through April 8, offers insight in how to break in as a studio script reader and to analyze screenplays, teleplays, treatments and novels.
Robert Kulzer was able to go from script reader in Germany to executive in Los Angeles to highly successful producer, all without ever leaving the company that gave him his very first job in the film business.
Paxton's wife, Louise, a professional script reader, brought Jim McGlynn's award-winning ``Traveller'' screenplay to her husband's attention as soon as she read it.
The genesis of the pic goes back to October 2007, when Geoff LaTulippe--in his fourth year as a script reader for New Line and frustrated with not having written scripts of his own--observed that Neustadter's own long-distance relationship could be the stuff of movies.
Sussman follows Lloyd's eversinuous career path, from his turns as Charlie Chaplin's tennis partner and "Limelight" actor to Lewis Milestone's script reader to stager of the first American production of Brecht's "Galileo," starring Charles Laughton, during the early days of HUAC.