Trade Sanction

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Trade Sanction

One or more trade barriers that a country places upon another country as a punitive action. A country may institute a trade sanction because it disagrees with its trade policies; for example, if country A subsidizes domestic corn so that it reduces demand for country B's imports, country B may restrict the import of country A's wheat as punishment. Alternatively, a trade sanction may occur when two countries disagree on a more fundamental level. A trade sanction should not be confused with an economic sanction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glen has 14 years of experience in US economic and financial sanctions, trade controls, anti-corruption and anti-money laundering law.
Forty-seven previously published articles and excerpts, presented in two volumes, are grouped under the following headings: governance, diffusion, democracy, domestic, immigration, conflict, sanctions, trade, and finance.
sanctions, trade with the region dropped to less than 2 percent in 2010, according to the Korea Institute for International Economic Policy in Seoul.
Despite various rounds of sanctions, trade between the two countries has thrived for many years.
Japan's top oil explorer Inpex may pull out of an oil field project in Iran, joining other global firms in abandoning activities there to avoid US sanctions, trade minister Akihiro Ohata said.
Categories: July 29, 2010, Export regulation, Exporting, Foreign governments, Foreign trade policies, International economic relations, International relations, International trade, International trade regulation, International trade restriction, Iran, Natural gas, Petroleum exploration, Restrictive trade practices, Sanctions, Trade regulation
They may be dressed-up as economic sanctions, trade barriers, commerce incentives or trade equalizers, but underneath all the verbal finery, a tariff is a weapon, a double-edged sword.
The UN have their own armoury of sanctions, trade embargoes and loan deals at their disposal.
The current battle of wills between Mr Mandela and the Nigerian regime goes well beyond the issues of sanctions, trade and oil embargoes.
Amanda concentrates in export controls and sanctions, trade remedies, customs, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and market access.
Categories: International Affairs, Exporting, Foreign governments, Foreign trade policies, Homeland security, International trade regulation, International travel, Law enforcement, Law enforcement agencies, Sanctions, Trade agreements, Trade regulation, Cuba