Salmonella

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Salmonella

A genus of bacteria known to cause illness in humans and animals, especially after they have eaten infected food. Salmonella infections have been associated with chicken eggs, a fact that in the past has caused marketing and other business problems in the poultry industry in the United States. However, fatal poisonings are extremely rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
Growth and penetration of Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella typHimurium in eggs.
Laboratory testing conducted by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets Laboratory Division identified the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg in samples of "kosher broiled chicken livers" and chopped liver products obtained from retail stores.
By June 15, following numerous visits to the doctor, it was determined that the antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Heidelberg had entered the child's bloodstream, and she was rushed to Doerenbecher Children's Hospital, where she was treated for seven days.
Sources of human Salmonella Heidelberg infection include consumption of poultry or eggs and egg-containing products (6-10).
a national food safety law firm, is investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg linked to the consumption of ground turkey.
The strains of Salmonella Heidelberg associated with the outbreak on the West Coast earlier this year were sensitive to the most commonly recommended and prescribed antibiotics used to treat infections with Salmonella.
According to the complaint, all ten plaintiffs had Salmonella Heidelberg infections linked to hummus served at the Pars Cove Persian Cuisine booth at the Taste of Chicago.
9, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As part of its ongoing testing program of the safety of meat and poultry in the food supply, Consumer Reports found a strain of Salmonella Heidelberg in a Foster Farms raw chicken sample that matched one of the strains associated with the current and major foodborne illness outbreak.