Load

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Related to Sales Fees: Sales Charges

Load

The sales fee charged to an investor when shares are purchased in a load fund or annuity. See: Back-end load; front-end load; level load.

Load

A sales charge or commission one pays for purchasing a mutual fund. The charge is paid to the person(s) who sold the investor shares in the fund. There are three types of load. A front-end load occurs when the shareholder pays the fee when buying into the fund. A back-end load means that the investor pays when selling his/her shares. Finally, an investor with a level-load fund pays periodically throughout his/her time as a shareholder. Studies have shown that load funds perform neither better nor worse than no-load funds.

load

The sales fee the buyer pays in order to acquire an asset. This fee varies according to the type of asset and the way it is sold. Many mutual funds impose a sales charge. As a result of the load, only a portion of the investor's funds go into the investment itself. Also called front-end load, sales load.

Load.

If you buy a mutual fund through a broker or other financial professional, you pay a sales charge or commission, also called a load.

If the charge is levied when you purchase the shares, it's called a front-end load. If you pay when you sell shares, it's called a back-end load or contingent deferred sales charge. And with a level load, you pay a percentage of your investment amount each year you own the fund.

load

the work which is assigned to a workstation (machine or operative) during a specified period of time. See PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING.

Load

A load is a sales charge imposed when mutual fund shares are purchased or redeemed.
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