Sale

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Sale

An agreement between a buyer and a seller on the price to be paid for a security, followed by delivery.

Sale

The act of relinquishing ownership of some asset in exchange for some monetary compensation. Sales may take any of several forms. In a cash sale, the seller receives cash or a cash equivalent immediately in exchange for the asset. In a credit sale, the seller surrenders ownership immediately in exchange for future payment, often with interest. An example of a sale is a simple transaction involving widgets. If the seller is willing to accept $2 per widget, and the buyer wishes to purchase 100 widgets, then the seller gives the buyer 100 widgets in exchange for $200. See also: Buy.

sale

  1. the purchase of a good or service by a buyer from a seller at a stated PRICE or, in some instances, through a BARTER or COUNTERTRADE arrangement.
  2. price reductions applied to individual items or across the board for a limited period of time by a seller, to increase sales of existing products (a sales period), to clear old stocks prior to selling new lines (an end of season sale), or to sell off the stock of a bankrupt business (a closing down sale).
  3. a specially convened gathering of sellers and buyers organized as a one-off event such as a jumble sale or on a regular basis such as a monthly AUCTION of second-hand cars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, this critical aspect of the merger paradox remains completely unaffected by increasing marginal costs, and the suggestion by Perry and Porter (1985, 226) that the results of Salant, Switzer, and Reynolds do not generally hold in a model of increasing costs should be amended accordingly.
This paper may be best thought of as complementary to Ley, Macauley, and Salant [2002] and the earlier version of that paper [Ley, Macauley, and Salant, 2000].
Salant and Shaffer's [1999] contribution is that even when it is costly to induce asymmetries in marginal costs (for example, via research and development expenditures), private and social optima are asymmetric if the cost of inducing the second stage asymmetry is less than the reduction in aggregate production costs.
Salant (1989, 1991) originally suggested that county services could be divided according to the roles these governments play.
Gilbert, consisted mainly of economists who had already committed themselves to Keynesianism, such as Walter Salant.
Whether it was calling on Philip Roth to recommend a Nation literary editor or persuading CBS News president Richard Salant to make Walter Cronkite anchor of CBS Evening News, Blair had a gift for the recognition and recruitment of excellence.
This profitability paradox of horizontal mergers in the Cournot model is particularly associated with the work of Szidarovzky and Yakowitz (1982) and Salant, Switzer, and Reynolds (1983) (also see Davidson and Deneckere 1984).
Last August, New York City-based textile company Salant Corp.
SETOLA, CEO of SALANT CORPORATION (SLNT), describes the company's business and its background; prospects for the industry, with positive and negative trends; competitive threats; strategic opportunities for the firm including its marketing plans and acquisition potential; management strength and organization; and the financial prospects of the firm looking forward.
Salant first became president of CBS News in February, 1961, was pushed out of the job three years later to be replaced by Fred Friendly, regained the position following Friendly's resignation in 1966, and stayed on until April, 1979, when he reached CBS's mandatory retirement age.
Salant Compiled and Edited by Susan and Bill Buzenberg Eastview Press.