Safe Haven Currency

Safe Haven Currency

A currency that investors trust more than others and which they therefore buy in times of uncertainty. Safe haven currencies are considered low risk because their issuing governments are stable and their economies tend to be strong, among other reasons. Examples of safe haven currencies include the U.S. dollar and the British pound.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some narratives point to the sharp widening in the dollar's yield advantage over the yen during the last week, though the Japanese currency, widely seen as a safe haven currency, still remains up on the buck by about 1% over this period.
In particular, in chapter 7, he argues that, given current institutional constraints, the goal of making the RMB a safe haven currency is a "mirage.
Acknowledging that the central bank's policy of negative rates and intervention has helped to meet its objectives, the IMF opined that the central bank should consider deeper negative rates, or cutting the existing threshold for deposits now exempt from negative interest, in order to make the franc even less attractive as a safe haven currency.
Switzerland's central bank added it had "intervened" in the foreign exchange market to stabilize the Swiss franc, considered a safe haven currency, following the Brexit verdict.
Zurich: Switzerland's central bank on Thursday announced it was introducing negative interest rates, in a bid to stop the Swiss franc -- a safe haven currency -- from gaining further value.
dollar seems invincible because each time there is economic turmoil, the rest of the world is forced to beat a path to America's safe haven currency - a circumstance unlikely to change soon, according to economist Eswar Prasad, who notes that despite the U.
The "Sabaek Al-Kuwait" report said that these data pushed investors towards acquisition of the yellow metal and abandon the dollar as a safe haven currency with continuing decline against European currencies and the Japanese yen.
The dollar remained weak in Tokyo trading hours, with some traders fleeing to buy the yen, deemed a safe haven currency.
THE MOST OVERVALUED major currency in the world is the Swiss franc, the safe haven currency that attracted offshore funds on an epic scale during successive euro crises in 2010-11.
The latest move by the SNB has converted the Swiss franc's status from safe haven currency to carry currency - with Swiss interest rates at zero per cent, essentially Swiss loans could be plowed into German bunds for a yield of just under two per cent.
However, with lending rates already close to zero, the Swiss central bank has been unable to cut rates in order to cool interest in the safe haven currency.
Heightened risk aversion and escalating concerns over the euro zone debt problems further support the safe haven currency.