Sack


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Sack

Predominately British; to terminate a person, especially with cause. For example, an employee caught stealing may be sacked, meaning he will no longer be employed at the company. The term is equivalent to firing.
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes, indeed, the neighbours thought it strange that the rich Miller never gave little Hans anything in return, though he had a hundred sacks of flour stored away in his mill, and six milch cows, and a large flock of woolly sheep; but Hans never troubled his head about these things, and nothing gave him greater pleasure than to listen to all the wonderful things the Miller used to say about the unselfishness of true friendship.
cried Robin, "fill our good friend the Sheriff a right brimming cup of sack and fetch it hither, for he is faint and weary.
Then one of the band brought the Sheriff a cup of sack, bowing low as he handed it to him; but the Sheriff could not touch the wine, for he saw it served in one of his own silver flagons, on one of his own silver plates.
So saying, he held up the sack of silver that Little John and the Cook had brought with them.
Then Robin Hood gave the sack of silver back to the Sheriff.
The company that waited for the Sheriff were all amazed to see him come out of the forest bearing a heavy sack upon his shoulders; but though they questioned him, he answered never a word, acting like one who walks in a dream.
A sceptical roar went up, and a dozen men pulled out their sacks.
Their sacks were slim, and with his own the three partners could rake together only two hundred dollars.
Everybody acknowledged Buck a magnificent animal, but twenty fifty-pound sacks of flour bulked too large in their eyes for them to loosen their pouch-strings.
And now there is the thunder of the huge covered wagon coming home with sacks of grain.
When John Sack went on 60 Minutes last November to discuss the investigation of his third Jewish interviewee, Solomon (Shlomo) Morel, the book became the subject of a major brouhaha among scholars, magazine journalists, book reviewers, and officials in American Jewish organizations.
To patch cracks or thin spots, tear a piece of waxed paper that is larger than the weak area; hold paper against weak spot on outside of sack.