Russian Ruble

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Russian Ruble

The currency of Russia. It was issued in 1998, replacing the Soviet ruble (which was also called the Russian ruble after the fall of the Soviet Union). Despite the issue of a new currency, it lost 70% of its value against the U.S. dollar in six weeks as a result of the Russian financial crisis. It is a floating currency.
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Ringmaa said, "This fall, freight volumes have increased compared to last year, because impacts from the drop in the price of oil, the Ukraine crisis and the ensuing sanctions, and also the impacts related to the weakening of the Russian currency were strongly expressed in freight flows already in the first half of last year.
be contributed to multiple factors includ- ing the Russian currency devaluation, while ISIL is slowing down the tourism coming out of the US and Europe to parts of the Middle East.
At the same time, despite opposition of the Ukrainian government, the Donbass militias are planning to organize their own elections in October and demonstratively introduce Russian currency in the region.
The Russian currency is seemingly making a comeback, gaining 94 kopecks against the US dollar to 69.
The Russian currency has depreciated over the past four weeks and the Kremlin and the central bank have stepped in with verbal interventions.
The effects of the oil price decline are being priced in now, for example in the Russian currency, the share price of UK oil companies and the energy sector of the US high-yield debt market," Keith Skeoch, CEO of Edinburgh-based Standard Life Investments, wrote in a note to clients.
According to the anonymous official: "The numbers of Russian tourists approaches 3 million at the end of 2014, and the collapse of the Russian currency will affect arrivals to Egypt.
The Russian currency is much weaker than the 30-35 seen in the first half of the year but well up from an all-time low of around 80 per dollar in mid-December.
The Russian currency has tumbled about 50 percent against the dollar so far this year, putting pressure on automakers, which have had to raise prices and contend with falling demand.
Although the Belarussian ruble is not officially pegged to the Russian currency, Belarus is highly dependent on its former master Moscow and is hugely sensitive to its economic woes.
The reason quoted for the abrupt closing down of the website was falling Russian currency ruble.
The Russian currency has almost halved in value since the summer amid low oil prices, looming recession and Western sanctions over Ukraine.

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