Runaway

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Runaway

1. A slang term for high inflation that proves difficult to control.

2. See: Runaway gap.
References in classic literature ?
The seventh man of the last batch of runaways had been caught and was even then at the gate.
Would I take Scotty, the runaway sailor, to visit the harpooner, on the opium- smuggler Idler?
Here I sat, inside my first ship, a smuggler, accepted as a comrade by a harpooner and a runaway English sailor who said his name was Scotty.
I could whip any runaway sailor seventeen years old.
This obliged them to fall upon them with the stocks of their muskets; and first they made sure of the runaway savage, that had been the cause of all the mischief, and of another that was hurt in the knee, and put them out of their pain; then the man that was not hurt at all came and kneeled down to them, with his two hands held up, and made piteous moans to them, by gestures and signs, for his life, but could not say one word to them that they could understand.
This chapter on runaways also devotes considerable attention to the defiant attitudes and behaviors of runaways, which raises my only real quibble with the book; I'm left wondering where the body as a category of analysis ends, and analysis of behavior begins.
From Still also comes the account of a confrontation between slave catchers and runaways in Cristiana, Pennsylvania in 1851.
Youth emotional problems were significantly related to recidivism for repeat runaways, whereas family changes and length of stay at the shelter were significantly related to recidivism for first-time runaways.
The information comes as part of a report published today, called Child Runaways.
In addition to menial labor, Army officers used the contrabands and runaways as sources of information on Confederate troops, activities, and sympathizers.
National averages indicate approximately 450,000 runaways in the United States at any given time.
Breakdown of the family also contributes to the number of runaways.