Rule 104

Rule 104

On the New York Stock Exchange, a rule requiring designated market makers to trade on their own accounts to help ensure a fair and orderly market. The rule also outlines other rights and responsibilities for designated market makers; for example, they must help the NYSE remain sufficiently liquid to provide for fair quotes. Previously, Rule 104 mandated that designated market makers (then known as specialists) not trade on their own accounts, but this was amended in 2008 as part of a wider streamlining of NYSE rules.

Rule 104

A New York Stock Exchange rule that prohibits specialists from trading for their own accounts except when such trades are necessary to maintain a fair and orderly market.
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decisionmakers to the Rule 104 standard, and prevent admission of
note 19, at 465 (stating that Rule 104s division between preliminary
The Rule 104 demand for judgment is a beginning effort to expedite and clarify this outcome, but--even if something like Rule 104 is adopted--cannot resolve all default cases.
They have charged Farrell under Rule 104 which states the club executive must be responsible for the safe-keeping of silverware at all times.
Rule 104 also significantly broadened the decision-making authority of trial judges:
He appointed the advisors under Federal Evidence Rule 104 rather than Rule 706 in order to keep the advisors "independent" of any ongoing proceedings.
It is expected that the appeal will be based around the contentious rule 104 which failed Carlow last week.
There are, however, advantages and disadvantages to both the trial court and the parties under either approach, which the parties should carefully weigh when seeking a Rule 104 hearing.
A Tipp appeal would be based on Rule 104 which states that a referee cannot make an award of a game.
Prior to the Supreme Court's decision in Joiner, defense counsel facing Daubert experts instinctively filed motions in limine challenging the admissibility of the testimony and seeking pre-trial evidentiary hearings under Federal Rule 104 or its state counterparts, typical of those conducted by Judge Jones in Hall v.
The decision by the Management Committee, which is chaired by GAA president Joe McDonagh, was based on a misapplication of Rule 104 by the Leinster Council.
Since district courts' findings are reviewed under an abuse of discretion standard, it is essential that defense counsel aggressively seek a Rule 104 hearing.