ROM

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ROM

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Romania. The code is used for transactions to and from Romanian bank accounts and for international shipping to Romania. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.

ROM (Read Only Memory)

a COMPUTER memory device from which data can be read but which cannot be written on to. The contents of such memory are fixed when the computer is manufactured, being incorporated in ROM micro chips.
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Roma children are segregated in schools and familiesmoved into ghettos, located in areas where no-one wants to live such as beside rubbish and chemical waste dumps Alexandra Bahor on the plight of the Roma
On healthcare, the report said the Roma were offered the same services as the rest of the population as it is the government's policy to integrate the population.
After meeting TOMS founder Blake Mycoskie at Neiman Marcus in 2009, he was inspired to start Roma Boots.
Turkey's two most famous Roma musicians, clarinetist HE-snE- E[currency]enlendirici, and darbuka player Balyk Ayhan, were also present at the Edirne event.
In Italy, the anti-immigrant Northern League responded to news of Maria's supposed abduction this week by demanding inspections of all Roma communities to check for missing children.
Although they contributed unique aspects of craftsmanship to society, the Roma were kept at a distance "through the creation of an array of stereotypical myths.
What connects past and present Roma history is a factor characteristic in the perception of the other, namely the silence regarding the extent of human rights violations inflicted on this population.
And they have expanded the clean-up to the surrounding areas not occupied by Roma but unkempt and strewn with litter all the same.
Hammarberg Slovakia report further said: "Generalisations and stigmatising speech targeting members of Roma communities have reportedly been resorted to by politicians across the political spectrum.
Six years ago, the Open Society Foundation, the World Bank, and nine national governments addressed the issue by elaborating a step-by-step plan to integrate the Roma into European society.
Tied together through Romani, their mother tongue, and loosely organized in insular tribes, the Roma have traditionally served as craftsmen, musicians or seasonal hired hands, and have a reputation throughout Europe as thieves and swindlers.
I am pleased that Macedonia is going to chair the Decade of Roma Inclusion in the next year.