Rogue Trading

Rogue Trading

The practice of trading securities using another person or institution's money without input or oversight from others. For example, an employee of an investment bank may trade with the bank's money without receiving authorization from or reporting it to his supervisor. Rogue trading generally is risky and usually is discovered when it leads to a large loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
My partner Millie read in the paper that the North East had become the UK's rogue trading blackspot, with the elderly and vulnerable being targeted.
They are responsible for investigating a range of offences such as scams that target the elderly, rogue trading, environmental offences and benefit fraud.
A rogue trading scandal in London cost UBS $2 billion.
Banamex, the Mexican subsidiary of Citigroup (NYSE: C), has dismissed two bond traders after uncovering rogue trading last year, Reuters has reported, citing sources familiar with the matter.
Year on year, our CCTV operators are instrumental in detecting crime and WORKING together with the police to manage Anti-Social behaviour, theft, rogue trading etc.
More than 20 police officers descended on the busy airfield market with the aim of tackling rogue trading.
These revelations are part of a longer string of rogue trading scandals which have revealed the fault often laid not at the feet of a single bad individual, but a whole system which could encourage otherwise good people to do bad things," said Spicer.
He claimed he then told her to speak to trading standards, but giving evidence via video link earlier in the trial, Ms Jackson claimed Cassidy said he was from Scambusters, a Wales-wide team of trading standards and police officers aimed at stopping rogue trading.
Five men were the victims of what can only be described as your rogue trading," a judge told him at Teesside Crown Court.
3 billion loss in a rogue trading scandal, management upheaval and thousands of job cuts.