Robert's Rules of Order

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Robert's Rules of Order

Rules for the conduct of meetings in an orderly manner. First used in 1876 by American army officer Henry Martyn Robert, who was asked to preside over a church meeting and discovered that neither he,nor anyone else,knew a proper or consistent way to conduct meetings. Today, almost all organizations, including those for condominiums, co-op apartments,homeowners groups,and others,adopt Robert's Rules of Order in their bylaws. (The official Web site at www.robertsrules.com warns that the earliest editions of the Rules are no longer copyright protected,and so may be found in reprint, masquerading as current editions.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Our President fielded numerous Robert's Rules questions.
However, many smaller decision-making bodies--boards, task forces, councils, and staff groups--find themselves chafing within the tight controls Robert's rules place on communication.
Many democratic organizations, including some cooperatives, have nominating committees that follow the recommendations of Robert's Rules of Order in submitting only one candidate for each board vacancy.
Robert's Rules of Order (RRO) is widely quoted but rarely read.
Early on ACT UP adopted Robert's Rules of Order for its procedures.
African Jewels members know that "business matters come first and the book discussion comes later," says Wooley-Davis, who runs the book club meetings according to Robert's Rules of Order.
As word spread that Laine was about to overturn his decision, the proponents of the Fiscal Institutions Act turned up the heat, arguing Robert's Rules of Order, the bible of parliamentary procedure, ruled that abstentions should not be counted.
Just the words "parliamentary procedure," however, are enough to scare off a meeting novice, but a book is available that makes Robert's Rules of Order understandable even to the timid layman.
In every arena in which adversaries compete to sway an audience, we have reasonable rules of engagement -- Robert's Rules of Order.
Robert's Rules of Order should be used to conduct the more formal business meetings.