Robber Barons


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Robber Barons

A pejorative term for wealthy industrialists in the late 19th century United States. Robber barons are credited with leading American industrialization and creating a great deal of wealth; however, they often did so through unethical means, many of which later became illegal. Price manipulation, union busting, and anti-competitive practices were common among robber barons. Well known robber barons include Andrew Carnegie, John W. Rockefeller and Cornelius Vanderbilt.
References in periodicals archive ?
You'll save yourself money and take some cash back from the robber barons.
We don't want water companies to be seen as 21st century robber barons, demanding price rises from consumers who cannot say no, but leaking water and restricting supplies to households in return.
It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies.
But in the nineteenth century, municipal governments and robber barons alike found new ways to steal from taxpayers and swindle investors.
Defending robber barons is just one of DiLorenzo's attacks on conventional wisdom, such as the belief that Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal economic program brought the United States out of the Great Depression during the 1930s.
It is obvious the ordinary population is disenchanted with the increasing numbers of politicians and levels of government and the tendency to act like medieval robber barons.
An Objectivist society would be a cold, vicious place, very much like our own during the age of the Robber Barons.
Big suits and robber barons of the post-beat era watched as Ed Templeton, Aaron Rose Raymond Pettibone, Carlo McCormick, and Ryan McGinley were match-missed with Brian Eno, Kim Gordon, Jeff Tremaine, Asia Argento and Nan Goldin.
We are fortunate to have the likes of Morris, who isn't looking for anything from the big studs, who should be operating a fair system, instead of behaving like robber barons.
By taking historic walking tours we learn about the Spanish influence, the Gold Rush in 1849, the home of some of the ruthless robber barons, and the influence of writers, artists and jazz musicians.
Stanley Park (its northern counterpart) has to suffer a great deal of pillaging before relying upon the modern day equivalent of robber barons to restore what remains of a once great park.
A recent World Bank-funded report concluded that the robber barons are still "as active as they ever were" and they are "not only free to roam, but are in fact encouraged to do so by persons whose proper role is to exercise control over them.