Ris

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Ris

1. An ancient Hebrew unit of length approximately equivalent to 135 meters.

2. A Talmudic unit of length approximately equivalent to 32 or 35 meters.
References in periodicals archive ?
40) Lastly, material interests matter too, as well as actors' knowledge of their interests: Risse shows that "the more actors are uncertain about their interests and even identities," the more arguing processes are likely to occur.
See Risse & Sikkink, supra note 3, at 14-17 (exploring
14) Remitiendose a una idea de Hugo Grocio, que luego hizo suya tambien Immanuel Kant ("la comun posesion de la superficie de la Tierra"), el argumento de Blake y Risse es que todos los integrantes de la Humanidad tienen un igual derecho moral a los recursos fisicos del planeta, y
A diferencia de Risse, Patten identifica correctamente la tesis central del argumento de Pogge.
Risse draws special attention to state actors' conscious efforts to construct such a common knowledge.
There is a strong parallel between the use of public pronouncements presented above and the arguments of Thomas Risse concerning rhetorical action.
and Thomas Risse (2009) "Diffusing (Inter-) regionalism: the EU as a model of regional integration".
In a former work, Risse showed his concern about the ways in which national and European identities mould each other and how identity changes with the progressive construction of the EU.
50) Risse takes the idea of communicative action out of its comfort zone, attempting to see just how far he can push the concept.
It reaches its liberal apogee in Kant (and Bentham); appears in several reflections on war and peace-making in Europe in the 19th Century and is thoroughly reconstructed as class relations by Marx and Lenin (Schmidt in Carlsnaes, Risse and Simmons, 2002, 3-22).
The first, "A Promenade for the Bronx," excavates the road's origins in the mind of a French surveyor, Louis Risse, who in the early 1890s envisioned a "Speedway" linking the woods and farms of the north with the tightly packed metropolis to the south.