Risky asset

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Risky asset

An asset whose future return is uncertain.

Risky Asset

An investment with a return that is not guaranteed. Assets carry varying levels of risk. For example, holding a corporate bond is generally less risky than holding a stock. Government bonds are generally not considered risky assets. A risky asset should not be confused with a risk asset.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin are a promising low-cost remittance platform for Filipino workers sending their earnings home but they are extremely risky investments due to lack of regulatory protection for consumers,' he said.
5 billion, which is a sign that confidence is returning and that investors are thirsty for risky investments.
Around the world pension funds are seeing high-carbon industries as risky investments.
This is especially important in the last 10 years or so before you plan to retire, when you will want to be in less risky investments.
Within an investment portfolio there may be a place for a more adventurous investment product, as this can help the overall portfolio's growth, but should it reduce in value, the losses may be partly mitigated by other less risky investments.
It had wound up the business following change in rules that prevented banks from investing their own money in risky investments.
But as the DIFC transforms from a regional centre to a global hub, it needs to make sure that it implements regulations that keep unnecessarily risky investments in check and keeps outright fraudulent forces at arm's length.
From my experience, when risky investments fail, people tend to shrug and say, "Well, I knew it was a risky movie (oil deal, alternative energy scheme, etc.
The national portfolio should not engage in any risky investments to avoid being held accountable by the people, he stressed.
Among the pitfalls Mandell warns against are the 'free' lunches offered alongside high pressure investment seminars notorious for pushing risky investments.
The Bank on Yourself Revolution: Fire Your banker, Bypass Wall Street, and Take Control of Your Own Financial Future comes from a financial investigator who shows Americans how to make their own savings decisions without risky investments, and comes from her background as a consultant to over 40,000 financial advisors for over 20 years.
The finding has real economic implications: When markets reel, people may be less inclined to make the risky investments needed to stop the free fall.