Risky asset

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Risky asset

An asset whose future return is uncertain.

Risky Asset

An investment with a return that is not guaranteed. Assets carry varying levels of risk. For example, holding a corporate bond is generally less risky than holding a stock. Government bonds are generally not considered risky assets. A risky asset should not be confused with a risk asset.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Fitch identified a large volume of potentially risky assets - RUB149 billion net of reserves, or 1.
After peaking in July this year, investor confidence has now fallen for five consecutive months; the last three of which have seen investors reduce their holdings of risky assets (an index reading below 100)," Michael Metcalfe, senior managing director and head of global macro strategy at State Street Global Markets, said in a statement.
The apex bank asked the banks to avoid risky assets so that their financial health is not stressed further.
People are pulling out of gold and moving to risky assets like shares and currencies to make profits," said Brian Lan, managing director at gold dealer GoldSilver Central in Singapore.
From a myopic perspective, liquidating risky assets and investing funds in risk-free assets may seem more profitable.
Elsewhere in the region, stocks retreated as investors weighed the likelihood of an interest rate increase by the powerful United States Federal Reserve, which could move liquidity away from risky assets like stocks.
Looking forward for the global recovery to continue in 2015, alongside the rally in risky assets.
A reading of 100 is neutral; it is the level at which investors are neither increasing nor decreasing their long-term allocations to risky assets.
New York, Rabi'I 23, 1435, Jan 24, 2014, SPA -- The Dow Jones industrial average is sharply lower as investors dump risky assets and pull money out of emerging markets.
Investors' aversion to risky assets intensified, leading them to sell the dollar in favor of the yen deemed as a relatively safe destination for investment funds, they added.
5 billion black hole in the Co-op's balance sheet stems from the former building society's risky assets.
Strong corporate reports and confidence of the investors in preservation of the policy of cheap money stimulate global buying of the risky assets.