Rise


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Rise

To increase in price, especially for a security. If a stock's price is $10 per share at the start of the trading day and $15 at the end, the stock is said to have risen.
References in periodicals archive ?
This rise in the female labor participation rate helps explain both the fall in the marriage and birth rates.
Because this average pace is below the rise in the economy's potential, they see the unemployment rate increasing to about 4 1/2 percent by the fourth quarter of this year.
Like the melting of ice from alpine glaciers and along Greenland's margin, drainage of underground water reservoirs for human use enhances sea-level rise because much of this water eventually runs into the ocean.
Indeed, wages, while showing some rise recently, still seem to be under control.
According to the report, scientists studying the rise will need more monitoring stations that record not only the sea level rise but also the rate of beach erosion and other secondary effects.
Also, house prices have firmed somewhat, which may have raised confidence in the investment value of residential real estate and thus contributed to the recent rise in the homeownership rate, which is now at its highest level since the early 1980s.
Price increases were damped last year by falling oil prices, near-stable prices for non-oil imports, and a further rise in labor productivity, which held down production costs in the domestic economy.
For all families, the median real home value for homeowners increased from $64,700 to $70,000, an 8 percent rise, whereas die mean increased from $87,500 to $107,400, a 23 percent rise (table 7).
In particular, energy prices increased sharply, as the rise in crude oil prices between November 1988 and May 1989 was passed through, and food prices surged as the agriculture sector continued to experience adverse supply developments.
Long-term interest rates, by contrast, have changed little, on net, over that same period; although these rates turned up in the spring of 1988, they leveled off over the summer and edged down in the fall, even as short-term rates were continuing to rise.