Right to Privacy

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Right to Privacy

The right not to be violated without one's consent. For example, the right to privacy includes the right to be secure in one's own person or home. The right to privacy in guaranteed in many jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions that do not explicitly provide a right to privacy may provide some protections. For example, a government may prohibit searches in a private area without a warrant.
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A critical distinction exists between informational and substantive rights to privacy.
A San Francisco trial judge in 1991 found that the legislation violated teen-agers' rights to privacy and equal protection, and an appellate court upheld the ruling three years later.
It would be imperative in any solution that all data and intelligence be secured and protected to such a level that rights to privacy are not compromised in any way by the actions of governments, business interests or hackers.
In recognition of the increased risks imposed by the move to electronic transactions, the law calls for compliance with a security standard designed to protect the confidentiality and integrity of health information and the information technology used to store, process, and transmit it and prescribes provisions to protect patients' individual rights to privacy.
The complaint upheld by the Court today alleges that DoubleClick's actions have violated California consumers' rights to privacy under the California Constitution; violated provisions of California's Penal Code concerning illegal eavesdropping on communications; and unjustly enriched DoubleClick at Internet users' expense.
com), announced today an innovative program designed to support its members' rights to privacy on-line and to highlight the ongoing need for consumer and industry awareness of privacy issues.
As the amount of business conducted over the Web grows exponentially, companies around the world are becoming increasingly sensitive about their employees' rights to privacy and a secure working environment," said Jeffrey Beir, president and chief executive officer of eRoom Technology.
Ann Brick, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, said the program could violate students' rights to privacy.
After the encounter in the women's restroom, Cruzan filed a complaint in October 1998 with the Minnesota Department of Human Rights alleging that her rights to privacy are being violated and that school officials are discriminating against her as a woman because of the school's policy of forcing her to share the women's restroom with the male librarian.