Right-to-Work

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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ballot title for Gibson's proposal should have at least acknowledged supporters' argument for right-to-work laws.
If you look at the negative impact of right-to-work laws on wages and other worker rights, it's significant.
The popularity of right-to-work laws may be a result of Americans' greater agreement with a major argument put forth by right-to-work proponents than by one of the main arguments put forth by opponents of such laws.
In a 58-41 vote by the Republican-dominated House to approve a Senate version of the law, Michigan became the 24th state to take a strike against organized labor with the right-to-work law.
The first right-to-work laws were passed in the 1940s and 1950s in response to the growth of unions.
Most importantly, right-to-work laws make it harder for responsible employers--union or not--to compete for business.
How this works is simple, and explains the inordinate power of union officials in so many states that have not adopted right-to-work laws.
Our right-to-work laws are a significant selling point to job creators, especially in contrast to states like Washington.
The South is the least union-organized section of the country; in fact, several southern states have passed right-to-work laws prohibiting unions.
Taft-Hartley Act) and subsequently abolish state right-to-work laws.
One exception is right-to-work laws, which allow workers not to join a union as a condition of employment.
On numerous issues -- so-called ''card check'' legislation for union organizing, a Bush-era regulation on overtime pay, an executive order allowing nonunionized companies to obtain federal contracts, state right-to-work laws -- Ms.