Right-to-Work

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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Missouri joins Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming in having right-to-work laws.
004 TABLE 4 PRODUCTIVITY AND RIGHT-TO-WORK LAWS Mean Median Std.
Henderson, The Confrontation of Federal Preemption and State Right-to-Work Laws, 1967 Duke L.
When states pass right-to-work laws, they protect their residents from being forced to forego 2% to 4% of their paychecks in union dues, pay initiation fees of about $50, and make contributions to frequently underfunded pension plans.
In places like Wisconsin, voters in the middle-class private sector support candidates who cut state pensions and pass right-to-work laws, so that economic governance can be more Texas-style.
Inviting signals/ Walters includes an analysis of the effects of right-to-work laws.
The real impact of right-to-work laws on state economies are lower wages, growing inequality and more struggling families.
The authors make the point, however, that reshoring may not be easy and bring up conditions to consider, such as the different tax laws in various states and the existence or not of right-to-work laws.
Although more Americans approve than disapprove of unions, they also widely support right-to-work laws.
The Texas model promotes opportunity and rewards ingenuity by having less government, low taxes, predictable regulations and the right-to-work laws that have prevented disasters like what we've seen in Detroit, Michigan," Abbott said.