Right-to-Work

(redirected from Right to Work Laws)
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Right-to-Work

Legislation at the state level in the United States prohibiting union shops, which are companies in which the employer agrees to require union membership from employees after a probationary period. In effect, right-to-work laws allow employees to benefit from union agreements without paying union dues. Right-to-work laws are controversial; both proponents and opponents claim that they reduce union power. The argument is over whether or not this is a good thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
average of 13 percent) and other such states is not a function of their Right to Work laws, as labor-union supporters would have us believe.
A better way of evaluating whether Right to Work laws help or hurt the poor--and the economy in general--is to compare Right to Work states as a group to non-Right to Work states.
Census Bureau data reveal that, while just 23 of the 50 states have Right to Work laws, more than half of the nation's population resides in those 23 Right to Work states.
Governor Walker claims that he does not support a Right to Work law for Wisconsin, but that has not satisfied those who support labor-union collective-bargaining privileges.
States should not need to pass right to work laws to protect themselves from bad Federal labor policy.
State right to work laws appear to be a pivotal policy variable.
The number of economic development policies adopted has increased over time in all categories, except for state right to work laws (SRWL).
The influence of right to work laws had a positive sign, but did not have a statistically significant relationship to growth in per capita income.
Yesterday, Oklahoma joined an elite group of states by passing a right to work law, the first state to pass such a law since 1985.
We have believed for many years that Oklahoma was being overlooked due to the lack of a right to work law.
Even without a right to work law, Oklahoma City has seen significant job growth and announcements over the past five years.