Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994

Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994

Law permitting interstate banking in the U.S.

Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994

Legislation in the United States repealing previous restrictions on banks from operating in more than one state. The Riegle-Neal Act allowed banks, under certain circumstances, to acquire banks or set up branches in other states without creating a separate subsidiary. The Act streamlined banking regulation in the United States, and, for the first time, allowed out-of-state residents to set up bank accounts. It also gave federal regulators the authority to ensure that out-of-state deposits do not dominate American banking.
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They will use to determine compliance with section 109 of the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994.
Banking regulators in the US have released the updated loan-to-deposit ratio which would be used to determine the compliance status of institutions with respect to the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994.
Given the economic/financial variables provided above, this study seeks also initially to investigate the impacts of two major federal banking statutes: the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (FDICIA); and the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994 (RNIBA).
On September 29, 1994, President Clinton signed into law the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994 (Riegle-Neal).
In the United States, the banking industry at the national level has undergone a series of major deregulatory moves over the past quarter century, beginning with the removal of some interest rate ceilings on deposits in 1978, followed closely by the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980, running through the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994, and culminating in the Gramm-Leaeh-Bliley Act of 1999, which overturns most of the provisions of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 and allows banks to affiliate with securities and insurance firms.
In cases involving interstate bank acquisitions, the Board also must consider the concentration of deposits nationwide and in certain individual states, as well as compliance with other provisions of the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994.
The McFadden Act and Douglas Amendment were repealed by the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994, which was signed into law by the President on September 29, 1994 and became fully operative on June 1, 1997.
The Compact was essentially abrogated a decade later by the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994, (4) new national banking legislation that overrode and preempted the various states' interstate banking laws and for the first time allowed for full interstate banking in the United States, effective July 1, 1995.
Section 102 of the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994 ("Riegle-Neal Act") authorizes a bank to merge with another bank under certain conditions unless, before June 1, 1997, the home state of one of the banks involved in the transaction adopted a law expressly prohibiting merger transactions involving out-of-state banks.
The Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994, which became fully operative on June 1, 1997, eliminated virtually all interstate banking and branching restrictions in the U.
The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency issued on May 22, 2003, the host state loan-to-deposit ratios that the banking agencies will use to determine compliance with section 109 of the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994.
The examination strategy and risk-focused examinations section is revised to discuss (a) Section 109 of the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994, which prohibits any bank from establishing or acquiring a branch or branches outside of its home state for the purpose of deposit production; and (b) an amendment (approved by the Board and the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC), effective October 1, 2002) that conforms the uniform rule (see Regulation H, section 208.