Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

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Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

United States legislation passed in 1970 that increased criminal and civil penalties for participating in organized crime and also strengthened law enforcement tools in the investigation of illegal enterprises. Its provisions included the ability to indict individuals for witness intimidation or extortion, prosecution for acts of terrorism or murder for hire, and so forth. One can be prosecuted under RICO for offenses such as counterfeiting money, securities fraud, and bankruptcy fraud.
References in periodicals archive ?
In collaboration with the Puerto Rico law firm of John Nevares and Associates, Levin Papantonio has just filed 140 arbitration claims on behalf of Puerto Rico investors against UBS.
The center stated that these RICO law consequences need to be nullified to "protect popular, and especially unpopular, political expression.
However, Judge Kessler ruled that the penalties she could impose on the tobacco companies were limited by a controversial appeals court ruling that restricted the remedies she could impose under the civil RICO law.
He has served as chair of the RICO Forfeiture and Civil Remedies Committee and is Advisory Board member to the RICO Law Reporter.
Civil RICO is just that; a civil cause of action based on unlawful conduct specified in the RICO law.
RICO Law Was Not Intended To Be Applied by Foreign Court and Its Application Here Is Not Valid
Robert Blakey, universally considered to be the foremost authority on RICO law, will be testifying on behalf of the Russian Customs Service.
Under the Federal RICO law, Bank of America can seek damages up to three times the amount of its losses.
Maxman practices primarily in antitrust, commercial and criminal litigation and RICO law.
Virtually all sales of cigarettes over the Internet are illegal because the sellers are violating one or more state and federal laws, including: (1) state age verification laws; (2) the federal Jenkins Act (which requires that such sales be reported to state authorities); (3) state laws prohibiting or regulating the direct shipment of cigarettes to consumers; (4) state and federal tax laws; (5) federal mail and wire fraud statutes; and (6) the federal RICO law.