Retirement Protection Act of 1994

(redirected from Retirement Protection Act)

Retirement Protection Act of 1994

Legislation designed to protect the pension benefits of workers and retirees by increasing required support of pension plans by employers.

Retirement Protection Act of 1994

Legislation in the United States designed to protect pensions for retirees and strengthen a government-administered program insuring them. Among its provisions, the Act required pension plans deemed to be underfunded to obtain enough cash and securities to cover benefits they were required to make. It increased the premiums for pensions insured by the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation that were in danger of default.
References in periodicals archive ?
He also oversaw the enactment of the Retirement Protection Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act.
The elective deferral limit (section 402[g][1]) created by the Retirement Protection Act of 1994 is $9,500(*), down from $45,475 in 1982.
Premium income reflected the combined effect of increased pension underfunding and higher premiums paid by underfunded plans as a result of the Retirement Protection Act of 1994.
PBGC Executive Director Martin Slate noted the Retirement Protection Act of 1994 contains provisions designed to improve funding gradually over a 10- to 15-year period.
Section 772(a) of the Retirement Protection Act of 1994(1) added section 4010 to ERISA.
The GATT financing legislation adopted the Retirement Protection Act of 1994 (RPA), which included rounding rules for various pension cost-of-living adjustments, eliminated the quarterly contributions requirement for fully funded single-employer defined benefit plans, extended through 2000 Sec.
In a speech before about 250 professionals of the Greater Cincinnati Employee Benefit Council in Cincinnati, Slate said the Administration's Retirement Protection Act of 1994 has created a positive climate for pensions.
The 1994 Retirement Protection Act removed the old $53 variable-rate premium cap for plan years starting between January l and June 30, 1996.
In a speech before nearly 300 professionals of the Southeast Employee Benefits Conference in Baltimore, Slate said the Administration's Retirement Protection Act of 1994 has created a positive climate for pensions.
Harvey Coustan, chairman of the AICPA tax executive committee, told the House Ways and Means Committee that while the Retirement Protection Act of 1993 (HR 3396) "addresses some of the issues protecting plan funding, additional important steps can and should be taken to ensure the necessary funds are put aside by plan sponsors to pay the benefits promised to American workers.
In a speech before the Southeast Tax Liaison Conference in Atlanta, Slate said the Retirement Protection Act of 1994 has created a positive climate for pensions.
Slate strongly endorsed the Retirement Protection Act (HR 3396 and S 1780) currently before Congress.
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