Resident Alien

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Resident Alien

A non-citizen who has permission to live and work in a country on a permanent basis. In the United States, a resident alien is subject to the same taxation as an American citizen, but may take foreign tax credits on taxes that are paid to the alien's home country.

Resident Alien

A citizen of another country who lives in the United States and/or has resident status by law or visa, or passes the substantial presence test.
References in periodicals archive ?
While it is legal for resident aliens to possess firearms and even carry them openly in North Carolina, they may not obtain a concealed carry permit because of the citizenship requirement.
Bear in mind also that many of these people were resident aliens and/or ex-convicts with long criminal records.
citizens, resident aliens and in some cases even non-resident aliens are required to file tax returns with the IRS.
All three trace a shift in the attitudes towards resident aliens (gerim), from the earliest (preexilic) laws of protection written into the Covenant (Exod.
citizens and resident aliens include all remuneration for services performed as an employee for an employer, regardless of whether the services are performed in the United States.
The Second Amendment Foundation filed a lawsuit in federal district court in New Mexico challenging that state's prohibition on the issuance of concealed carry permits to legal resident aliens.
Nevertheless, I conclude that Fletcher and Pryal, as lawful permanent resident aliens, have demonstrated that they are protected by the Second Amendment right to bear arms.
From 1945 to 1912, the Manzanar War Relocation Center, an internment camp in Inyo County for Japanese American citizens and resident aliens during World War II, lay deserted and disremembered--a forgotten and hidden part of the state's history.
The book's thesis is two-pronged, contributing on the one hand to scholarship on early Christian self-definition and the language of Christians as resident aliens, and on the other hand to American theological conversations that draw on these early Christian traditions.
Among the topics are foreigners under foreign rule in Kassite Babylonia during the second half of the second millennium BC, non-priestly and priestly legislation concerning strangers, resident aliens and natives in the holiness legislation, and Gentile Yhwh-worshipers and their participation in the cult of Israel.
Dunning explores the topos of Christians as resident aliens, carried by terms such as "aliens," "sojourners," and "strangers," in four early works:
In their book Resident Aliens (Nashville: Abingdon, 1989), Stanley Hauerwas and William H.

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