Rentier


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Rentier

1. A person who makes most or all of his/her income from the rental or property.

2. A state or government that has access to a great deal of liquidity and uses it to maintain hegemony over its population. For example, it may provide free or inexpensive health care using its excess money. Rentier states rarely assess taxes, and often acquire their liquidity through the sale of their natural resources, such as oil. Citizens of rentier states often (though not always) have little loyalty to these countries, which may go through difficult transition periods when the natural resources run out. See also: Rents.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He called on officials to set an example by not taking advantage of the rentier economy.
This outcome is all the more surprising as it goes against the argument that the rentier states are autonomous in relation to their societies.
Lastly, if Saud is ousted and Iranian trade does consequently dip, as it surely would under Khalid's premiership, then the Iranian sized hold in RAK's economy will have to be filled - quickly - by Abu Dhabi lest they wreck the fragile rentier bargain.
60) With fewer and fewer external sources available, the rentier Arab states have three general options:(61) (a) turn toward the West and the IMF/World Bank for debt relief(62); and/or (b) begin a shift toward greater internal revenue enhancement; or (c) muddle through with half measures derived from the two previous choices and barter political concessions with external actors for economic gain.
Gulf of Mexico), following the mammoth oil discoveries in the Middle East, (3) the utilization of "posted prices" for calculating the oil exporting governments' share of oil royalties and oil rents, and (4) collective representation of the major oil-exporting rentier states within OPEC.
Although the oil-rich Gulf States embody the perfect contemporary example of rentier states in the Arab world, they are by no means the only ones.
Supporting repressive Israeli actions, backing one side or the other in domestic conflicts, turning a blind eye to human rights abuses committed by ruthless governments, whose leaders-for-life run rentier states and care little about diversifying their countries' economies - these are only some of the crimes that America is perceived to be associated with by its Arab critics.
The analysis surveys the Dutch disease, rentier state, and rent-seeking versions of the resource curse and finds they have significant shortcomings in terms of theory and evidence.
The rentier economy provides few jobs in modern productive activity; the high end is controlled by extended family-clan members and foreign financial corporations via ex-pat experts; technical and low-end employment is taken up by contract foreign labor, at income levels and working conditions below what the skilled local labor force is willing to accept.
The incoming government needs to learn how other rentier states have maintained stability.
In his quest to change our understanding of the politics of the resource-rich rentier states, Dunning uses a multi-method approach--among the employed tools the reader will find field research with detailed country-by-country case studies, series of game-theoretic models, statistical analysis, and conceptual elaboration of the core idea of the 'rentier state'.
Chipkin mines the city's origins in a virtuoso tour through politics, theory, art, life and language itself, introducing words from the French lexicon which became irreplaceable in describing this city: speculator, careerist, rentier, profiteer, entrepreneur.