Nationalism

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Nationalism

The philosophy in which one promotes the interests of one's own country or ethnic group over others. For example, nationalism may advocate secession of a region to form a new country in which one's own ethnic group predominates. What qualifies as a "nation" in nationalist terms is a matter of some disagreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Religious nationalism (29) is the type preferred by people who establish a community exclusively on the basis of religious beliefs and values or who are under heavy influence of religious beliefs.
The attack on the mosque in Ayodhya, which is the focal point of religious nationalism, took place when Congress was in power.
It is an example "of the bad things that can occur when a leading political party bases its appeal on a religious nationalism wedded to ideas of ethnic homogeneity and purity.
Religious nationalism, terrorism, oppression of children, the neglect of the disabled, pervasive poverty, powerful global media, and the persecution of socioreligious minorities are among the leading concerns facing the world.
But it is true that religious nationalism sets the context in which the terrorist problem arises in the Islamic world.
One way forward for Sri Lanka would be to separate the state from religion, to use English as a working language and to abandon linguistic and religious nationalism.
He proceeds to point to a convergence of orientalist scholarship and nationalist sentiment in great projects of textual criticism such as the critical editions of the Mahabharata and the Ramayana in the twentieth century, and the making of the Bhagavadgita into a canonical text that was central to religious nationalism.
Ancient sources and examples are still a significant source of inspiration for these groups, but the ideology that undergirds their militancy is one that is best described as a form of religious nationalism.
In the Old Testament, God is the God of Israel, but, in the context of the overall revelation of the Bible, this cannot be the basis for a narrow religious nationalism.
Obviously the book contained a stern and uncompromising critique of Russia's religious past, and this cut all too deeply into the prevailing atmosphere of exultant religious nationalism in the circles of Russian emigration.
For example, Greek nationalism for the last two centuries has been divided between the neo-Hellenism of the secular elite and the Orthodox, religious nationalism of much of the population.