Regionalism

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Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
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Most of these regional parties were our ally in the past.
Though in the outgoing Lok Sabha, Congress is in the lead from Andhra Pradesh, the Telengana issue may enhance the importance of regional parties.
Fourteen regional parties have already met once on October 28 last year.
The 70s and 80s, therefore, saw a tussle between the Congress party on the one hand and the regional parties on the other for assigning greater power to the states (Arora: 2004).
Some 25 of them are national and the remaining regional parties.
The Indian political map has become highly fragmented as the two largest national political parties, the Indian National Congress and the Bharatiya Janata Party, have lost ground in many states to powerful emerging regional parties.
But neither group is expected to get close to the 272 seats needed for a parliamentary majority, leaving the balance of power in the hands of a multitude of regional parties.
Regional parties including the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP), the Samajwadi Party (SP) and Lalu Prasad Yadav's Rashtriya Janata Dal command large vote banks in states like Uttar Pradesh and Bihar.
All regional parties need to be involved in developing a package of carrots and sticks regarding the North.
Each of the five regional parties will be linked by huge television screens, so revelers at each location can see what their counterparts are enjoying at the others.
Cllr Tandy (Nuneaton, Attleborough) said: "We intend to approach regional parties, including the appropriate district councils and MPs with a view to representations and a joint delegation to the government.
s vigorous party organization, observing that power in both organizations tended to devolve to the executive and that German regional parties enjoyed more autonomy than British ones.

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