Redemption or call

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Redemption or call

Right of the issuer to force holders on a certain date to redeem their convertibles for cash. The objective usually is to force holders to convert into common prior to the redemption deadline. Typically, an issue is not called away unless the conversion price is 15%-25% below the current level of the common. An exception might occur when an issuer's tax rate is high, and the issuer could replace it with debt securities at a lower after-tax cost.


1. In bonds, the act of an issuer repurchasing a bond at or before maturity. Redemption is made at the face value of the bond unless it occurs before maturity, in which case the bond is bought back at a premium to compensate for lost interest. The issuer has the right to redeem the bond at any time, although the earlier the redemption take place, the higher the premium usually is. This provides an incentive for companies to do this as rarely as possible.

2. The act of the issuing company repurchasing stocks or mutual funds. In the case of mutual funds, the repurchase is made at net asset value per share. Stocks may be redeemed in cash or by proration. See also: Proratable factor.