Give up

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Give up

Used for listed equity securities. (1) Term used in a securities transaction involving three brokers, as follows: Broker A, a floor broker, executes a buy order for broker B (a member firm broker who has too much business at the time to execute the order). The broker with whom broker A completes the transaction (the sell-side broker) is broker C. Broker A "gives up" the name of broker B, so that the record shows a transaction between broker B and broker C even though the trade is actually executed between broker A and broker C; (2) distribution of commissions to brokerage houses not participating in a trade. This is a grey area of the law governing reimbursement of a broker for services (e.g., research). See: Directed brokerage.

Give Up

For a broker to execute an order on behalf of another broker. Giving up occurs as a professional courtesy when a broker receives an order from a client that he/she is too busy to execute. It is important to note that the broker who receives the order, rather than the broker who conducts the transaction, is the one who earns the applicable commissions and fees. The term originates from the fact that the broker who executes the transaction must "give up" the commission to other broker.
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Anna Noonan, of the Civil Aviation Authority, said: "Cabin air is a blend of at least 50-50 fresh air and recycled air.
AAEROPLANES with their recycled air and enclosed environment with a large group of people can be the trigger for all sorts of respiratory infections.
Recycled air contains germs and bacteria which are then spread to passengers.
People are concerned about the recycled air that is filtered in airplanes and office buildings.
The recycled air found in airplane cabins can trigger allergy symptoms.
My doctor said that it is easy to pick up viruses from the recycled air on aeroplanes.
The Lords also found airlines were spreading infections among passengers by pumping stale, recycled air around their cabins.
Farrol Kahn, director of the Aviation Health Institute, a charity based in Oxford, says air travellers are at risk from infections carried in the recycled air on board as well as blood clots from sitting for hours in cramped conditions.
Farrol Kahn, of the Oxford-based Aviation Health Institute, says air travellers are at risk from infections - including serious diseases such as tuberculosis - carried in the recycled air.
Ideal after long flights, when all that recycled air zaps the skin's vitalityBody Shop Cheeky Fruits .
Scientists blame this phenomenon on the recycled air we have to breathe on an air- conditioned flight.
Experts say the TB germs can last 15 minutes in the air but even longer in the confined space of an aircraft with recycled air.