Accommodation

(redirected from Reasonable accommodation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Accommodation

A form of loan in which the borrower is not obligated to compensate the lender. These loans are often accompanied by accommodation bills, which guarantee that a third party compensates the lender, should the borrower be unable.  Troubled financial institutions frequently use accommodation loans.

Accommodation

In the Uniform Commercial Code, a situation in which a seller makes delivery of goods of insufficient quality. The buyer may accept or reject the whole of the goods, but may not accept only a portion. See also: Partial Performance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The DA cannot be found liable for failing to provide a reasonable accommodation if an employee does not request one and DA is otherwise unaware of the need for one.
If reasonable accommodation requests to employees have been denied based on a determination that they did not satisfy the "disability" requirements of the ADA, reconsider whether the ADAAA changes that analysis.
Aside from the law, providing a reasonable accommodation to an employee who has already proven their value to the organization is a sound, ethical business decision.
Under the ADA, documentation is sufficient if it describes: the "nature, severity and duration" of the employee's disability; which activity(s) the disability limits and to what extent; and how a requested reasonable accommodation would allow the disabled employee to continue working and performing the essential functions of the job.
Do not tell your employer that you are disabled or that you will be needing reasonable accommodations until after you have completed the work outlined below.
To establish an ADA claim a student-athlete must show: he has a disability, the defendant is subject to the ADA, and that he was denied the opportunity to participate in or benefit from services or accommodations on the basis of his disability and that reasonable accommodations could be made that do not fundamentally alter the nature of the defendant's services or accommodations.
Reasonable accommodation is any change or adjustment to a job or work environment that permits a qualified employee with a disability to perform the essential functions of the job or to enjoy the benefits and privileges of employment equal to those enjoyed by other employees.
Reasonable accommodation is defined as any change or adjustment to a job or work environment that permits a qualified applicant or employee to participate in the interview process, perform the job or simply enjoy the same benefit or opportunity of people without disabilities.
Zunker also reminded counselors that the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA; West, 1993) requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to individuals with disabilities.
The court held that the tests were a violation of the inmate's right to free exercise of religion, but the inmate was required to prove that he "sincerely held" the religious beliefs professed by him, and that he was denied reasonable accommodation for the exercise of his beliefs.
A psychiatrist in a fitness-for-duty exam may also be called upon to decide what is a reasonable accommodation for a person with a psychiatric disability.
Gordon explains that the primary rule is that while a residence must offer reasonable accommodation, it does not have to change its basic program.