Real

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Real

Used in the context of general equities. (1) natural, (2) not dividend roll-or program trading-related; (3) not tax-related. "Real" indications have three major repercussions: a) pricing will be more favorable to the other side of the trade since an investment bank is not committing any capital; b) price pressure will be stronger if real since a natural buyer/seller may have information leading to his decision or more behind it, and c) an uptick may be required for the trader to transact if the indication is not real and the trader has no long position.

Real

1. Describing a variable that takes inflation into account. For example, when considering GDP growth, if GDP has grown 10% in dollar terms, and the inflation rate is 3%, real GDP growth is only 7%. See also: Nominal.

2. See: Tangible.
References in periodicals archive ?
The biggest challenges lie ahead for the early years, youth services and 16-19 education, where spending is set to fall by around 20 per cent in real terms.
We predict the GDP in real terms to grow by 5 percent in 2010, because our oil production is expected to be higher this year," he said.
The Lib Dems have said they would change the regulated fare formula to RPI minus 1 per cent so that fares should come down in real terms every year.
With little or no cash increase, from 2011/12, the NHS will need to plan for real terms funding to fall by 2.
That didn't make him take tax off petrol, which is today a lot MORE expensive in real terms.
We are en route to a 12% Selic rate by the end of 2007, and between 7% and 8% in real terms," says Fabio Silveira, a partner at RC Consultores.
9% increase in real terms over the amount reported on June 30, 2000, due to the integration of Dacotah Cement assets, acquired in March 2001.
In real terms (values are adjusted by the change in the CPI at 1.
Bolstered by the gains in these sectors, the four-quarter rise in the final purchases of households and businesses amounted to about 5 percent in real terms in 1993, matching the large 1992 rise.
8 percent) in real terms, according to statistics provided to Coopers & Lybrand Hospitality Directions by the Hotel and Motel Brokers of America (HMBA), which maintains a comprehensive database on hotel sales.
While per capita health care expenditures in real terms have more than doubled since 1955 (and gone up nearly five-fold in nominal dollars), the proportion of disposable income used for out-of-pocket health care expenditures is literally unchanged at 3.
In the pollution arena, the huge budgets for Superfund cleanup of toxic waste sites caused spending to rise, in real terms, between 1984 and 1989.