Real Economic Growth Rate

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Real Economic Growth Rate

The change in a nation's GDP after accounting for inflation. The economic growth rate (or GDP growth) shows how much GDP has grown or shrunk in raw dollar amounts and may not be an accurate accounting of how well or poorly an economy is performing. The real economic growth rate adjusts for how much buying power has been affected and therefore provides a more accurate view. For example, if the economic growth rate is 10% and the inflation rate is 3%, the real economic growth rate is 7%. See also: Real GDP, Nominal GDP.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experts forecast the real economic growth in Kyrgyzstan in 2015, taking into account economic slowdown in the region, at around 2%," he said.
The real economic growth is projected to reach a robust 5.
Some wealthy clients now prefer these types of investments to "capture real economic growth," and to avoid the volatility of stock markets, he said.
The government has forecast real economic growth of 0.
Regarding prospects for the nation's real economic growth rate in 2015, 13 leaders each said: "1 per cent to less than 1.
23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Real economic growth in the U.
One of the few regions that still exhibits real economic growth is Central and Eastern Europe.
MANAMA: Bahrain's real economic growth increased to 3.
The European banking system has reached a size where its marginal contribution to real economic growth is likely to be nil or negative.
These objectives call for a speeding up of real economic growth to about 4% during the period.
The Congress could best contribute to a clarification of the FOMC's policy direction by enacting the Neal Resolution, which specifies an ultimate goal of achieving the highest sustainable rate of real economic growth through the maintenance of purchasing power stability.
Will we, instead, continue either unable or unwilling to make coherent investment decisions as we search for that elusive "bottom"; in trusting in real economic growth.