Liberalism

(redirected from Radical liberalism)
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Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
In South Germany, together with the struggle against the priesthood, the aristocracy and officialdom, there now came into existence for the first time since the 1860s a form of radical liberalism combining national-liberal imperialist patriotism with economic policies based on a compromise between tariff policies (Schutzzolle) and a free market (Absatz) for industrial products.
Here the circle comes to a close: Judge Bork outlined how classic liberalism degenerated into radical liberalism, and Barber argued that the egalitarian values of radical liberalism and "McWorld" are the two sides of the new modern coin.
It's a cultural war between Christianity and radical liberalism," he said at the opening of the recent conference.
Kidd also looks at the politics of these groups, moving from Cobdenite radical liberalism to conservatism, as well as the terrible social costs of the city's growth, popular movements and culture, and the importance of immigrant groups of Irish and Jews.
com is providing a voice for single conservatives, because there needs to be a real alternative to the radical liberalism fostered by the so-called 'mainstream' dating sites.
However, she appears to have abandoned radical liberalism, which included home rule, of early activists like Keir Hardie at Merthyr or Jim Griffiths at Llanelli.
It is an overture to the centre left in the form of an invitation to travel back in time to conduct an argument over its conflicting traditions of radical liberalism and socialism.