Liberalism

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Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
In South Baden, the Echo vom Wald claimed before the festivities that in Baden the word "conservative" meant "anruchig" (having a bad reputation), and that radical liberalism was strongly opposed to clerical conservatism and to powerful figures of the the aristocracy and bourgeoisie.
However, she appears to have abandoned radical liberalism, which included home rule, of early activists like Keir Hardie at Merthyr or Jim Griffiths at Llanelli.
But this liberalism is invisible, as it is in the ALP's history as well: Labor's role as the residual heir of nineteenth-century radical liberalism is ignored.
It is a current that includes some inspired by democratic socialism, but mostly includes a new generation inspired by some form of populism, radical liberalism open to refinement as either anarchist or socialist.