Racket


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Racket

1. A fraudulent or otherwise illegal business practice. For example, a Ponzi scheme is a racket because no service is offered: new investors simply pay old investors.

2. A company that engages in illegal or fraudulent activities.
References in classic literature ?
Agatha went away apparently unconcerned, though her hand shook as she put aside her racket.
The long winter evenings within the castle of Torn were often spent in rough, wild carousals in the great hall where a thousand men might sit at table singing, fighting and drinking until the gray dawn stole in through the east windows, or Peter the Hermit, the fierce majordomo, tired of the din and racket came stalking into the chamber with drawn sword and laid upon the revellers with the flat of it to enforce the authority of his commands to disperse.
These mysterious articles were followed, however, by others which were more within their, range of comprehension--by a pair of dumb-bells, a purple cricket-bag, a set of golf clubs, and a tennis racket.
And these puppies that made such a racket belonged to the wild dogs.
Suddenly, as they were about to boldly enter through the opening, there arose a harsh clamor of sound that swelled and echoed on every side, until they were nearly deafened by the racket and had to put their fingers to their ears to keep the noise out.
Augustus was in bed asleep, but Marhall hammered on the door until he got up and come down, wanting to know what all the racket was about.
The yelling was of no use, for the Marionettes, instead of going on with their act, made twice as much racket as before, and, lifting up Pinocchio on their shoulders, carried him around the stage in triumph.
The truth is, I came to the gate, where some dozen or so of devils were playing tennis, all in breeches and doublets, with falling collars trimmed with Flemish bonelace, and ruffles of the same that served them for wristbands, with four fingers' breadth of the arms exposed to make their hands look longer; in their hands they held rackets of fire; but what amazed me still more was that books, apparently full of wind and rubbish, served them for tennis balls, a strange and marvellous thing; this, however, did not astonish me so much as to observe that, although with players it is usual for the winners to be glad and the losers sorry, there in that game all were growling, all were snarling, and all were cursing one another.
He wos a wery peaceful, inoffendin' little creetur, and wos alvays a-bustlin' about for somebody, or playin' rackets and never vinnin'; till at last the turnkeys they got quite fond on him, and he wos in the lodge ev'ry night, a-chattering vith 'em, and tellin' stories, and all that 'ere.
He wore no neckerchief, as he had been playing rackets all day, and his Open shirt collar displayed their full luxuriance.
Murray Whitelaw caught the star's racket when he threw it into the crowd after beating Belgium's David Goffin to win the cup for Team GB.
Now, though, the 31-year-old is trying to take himself and his sport to another level commercially by introducing a revolutionary high-class racket.